The Rugby Groud Guide


Stadium Name: The Recreation Ground

Stadium Address Spring Gardens


                                BA2 6PW


Ground Information:

In the pre-professional days up to 1995, Bath were one of the dominant teams in English rugby. Since then, however, they have struggled to find success, though they did become the first English team to win the Heineken Cup, in 1998.

A major reason for this must be the lack of income from the 12,200 spaces at the Rec.While teams such as Leicester and Harlequins have been able to expand their facilities and enjoy the income that they provide, Bath have been hamstrung by their inability to expand. With the River Avon behind one stand and public land behind the other, the club have been in a more than decade-long struggle with the local council and Recreation Ground Trustees to find a solution that would allow them to push capacity towards the 20,000 figure.

July 2014

Bath’s temporary planning application to increase the Rec capacity from 12,000 to close to 14,000 for the next two seasons, in the lead up to the club’s 150th anniversary has been approved.

Bath remain focused on securing their long-term future at the Rec and this temporary application is separate to the club’s main plans to redevelop their ageing facilities.


The facilities at The Rec may not be top drawer but the setting is wonderful compensation. The ground is wonderfully situated beside the River Avon, with the historic buildings of this Georgian city presiding over the action.

The largest stand at The Rec is the Wadworth 6X stand on the western side of the ground, which offers covered seating to the rear and uncovered seating at the front. This stand doesn’t quite run the length of the pitch, but at the south end there is an additional small covered stand known as the Centurion Stand. Both the Wadworth and Centurion Stands have some small supporting pillars, and offer some (but not total if you’re at the front) protection from the elements.

Sitting opposite the Wadworth 6X Stand is the Novia Financial Stand, a large two-tiered affair with uncovered seating.

To the south of the ground is the IPL Stand, with small blocks of seating at the bottom level, and hospitality boxes above.

The North or Clubhouse end of the ground has two sections of uncovered terracing, and there is another small section of terracing in the north-east corner.

Bath's is not the biggest stadium, but to save yourself a                 long and mystifying walk follow the instructions on the ticket:

                William Street Gate:       Accessed from Great Pulteney Street via William Street

                Sports Centre gate:         Accessed from North Parade road via the Sports Centre.

                Riverside Gate:                 Accessed from Argyle Street by going down to the river   using the steps opposite the Bath Rugby Shop

South Gate:        Accessed from North Parade Road, going down the steps at the end of Parade Bridge onto the tow path.

                Gates to the ground open 2 hours prior to kick-off.



Club Office          Bath Rugby RFC

                                Farleigh House

                                Farleigh Hungerford

                                Bath BA2 7RW

                                Telephone          01225 325200

Fax         01225 325201


Ticket Office:    

The Bath ticket office is located at 8 Pulteney Bridge (next to the club shop)

Matchday collections can be made from the old ticket office at The Rec, located underneath the 6X Stand, from

The ticket office is open from 9.15 until 5.15, Monday to Friday and on matchdays from 9.00 until kick-off.

Ticket Hotline: 0844 448 1865


Ticket Prices 2016/17:

Go To:


Disabled Facilities

Bath have a number of positions specially designed for supporters in wheelchairs, and are asked to contact the ticket office for more information


Bath Rugby does not have match day parking facilities at the Recreation Ground as such. However, there are 36 disabled spaces per season (usually taken by season ticket holders) available at the ground.

Additionally, there are 4 spaces available on a first-come, first served basis, accessed via the Bath Leisure Centre entrance, with just a short walk through the Hamptons International Stand.

There are a number of NCP car parks within a short distance of the ground, and they also operate a Park and Ride service from their old Lambridge Training ground on the A4 London Road


Seating & Tickets

There are 15 spaces for disabled supporters in wheelchairs situated behind the try line in the Hamptons International Stand. 8 of these are covered. Carers sit alongside the wheelchair user. The ticket prices  are an inclusive price for both the disabled person and carer.

 There are no special arrangements in place for visually impaired supporters nor for ambulant disabled supporters, other than covered seating in the West and Hamptons International Stand.

 Toilet Facilities

Disabled toilet facilities can be found in the West and Hamptons International Stands.

There is also a portable disabled toilet near to the Clubhouse, although the Clubhouse itself does not yet have disabled toilet or catering facilities.

  Catering and Bar Facilities

Bar facilities can be found in the Hamptons International Stand,the Helpshire (East) Stand,the Blackthorn Rig and the Blackthorn (West)Stand.

Catering facilities can be found in the Hamptons International Stand, the Clubhouse Bar, the Clubhouse food hatch, the West Bar and at the two mobile Bath Organic Farmers food trailers.

However, not all of these facilities cater specifically for the disabled.






Last Updated July 2016



Copyright : Miles & Miles Publishing 2016

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