The Rugby Groud Guide

Munster Rugby - Travel

How to get to the City  

               

How to get to the City  

               

Air:         There are many direct flights from the UK to Shannon International Airport.

                If flights are fully booked, Cork Airport, 60 miles from Limerick, is a good bet

                with most major airlines making the connection with the UK.

               

                www.shannonairport.com

                www.cork-airport.com

               

               

Sea and Road     Ferry from Swansea to Cork (Crossing takes 10 hours)

                Limerick is about 2 hours drive from Cork

                Ferry from Pembroke to Rosslare (Crossing takes 3 hours 30 minutes)

                Limerick is about 4 hours drive from Rosslare.

                Ferry from Holyhead to Dublin (Crossing 1 3/4 to 3 1/2 hours)

                Then 3 hour drive to Limerick

               

                From Limerick City Centre: Turn left at the junction between O'Connell and

                William Street and go on the Sarsfields Bridge. Continue for about 400m to the

                Ennis-Shelbourne Road Junction. Turn right at the traffic lights and go straight

                on to the next set of lights, turn left and Thomond Park is opposite.

               

               

Rail        Iarnroid Eireann, Ireland's national train company operates from Cork's Kent train

                station and is located on the lower Glanwire Road, 10 minutes walk from the city

                bus station.

               

                The closest station to Thomond Park is Colbert Station, Parnell Street, Limerick

                There are direct inter-city services from Dublin and Cork.

                It’s a long hike to Thomond Park from Colbert Station, and it’s advisable to get

                a taxi.

                www.irishrail.ie

               

               

Getting About   The Shannon River flows through central Limerick by the old town on King's

                Island. The city centre is south of the river and revolves around O'Connell

                Street.

 The tourist office is right in the centre on Arthurs Quay , and the bus and train station is to the south of O'Connell Street.

The stadium is in the north-west corner of town, a 30-40 minute walk. There are plenty of pubs that line the way. There are two routes to the ground. One option is to take Thomond Bridge by King John's Castle and walk for just under a mile towards Hasset's Cross junction-look out for the floodlights to guide you.

                Alternatively, cross Sarsfield Bridge and stroll for about half a mile before turning into Shelbourne Road at Union Cross. When you get to Hasset's Cross, at the next set of lights go left.

                                www.visitlimerick.com

By Car   Reaching Cork by car is relatively straightforward as the road system connects all of the large cities. Main roads serving the city include the N8 from Dublin, N25 from Waterford,N20 from Limerick and N71 from West Cork

                Musgrave Park is accessible from the South Ring Road.

Parking There is a park and ride facility in operation for Munster matches in the Black Musgrave Park Ash Park and Ride, located off the South City Link Road and ten minutes walk from the stadium.

               

Thomond Park  There is a 10 car car-park in the North East corner of the Stadium, but on match-days is limited to pass holders.

               

Bus         Bus Eireann provide a nationwide network and service to Cork. The Cork City bus station is located at Parnell Place.

                Musgrave Park is located between Pearse Road and Tramore Road in Ballyphehane, and the number 3 bus operates from Patrick Street (around the corner from Parnell Place) to Ballyphehane.

                The city bus stop is located outside Brown Thomas and there is a bus stop right outside the Dolphin entrance of Musgrave Park on Pearse Road

               

               

 

 

Updated October 2015

 

Copyright Miles & Miles Publishing 2015

               

               

               

               


              

Rugby’s Summer becomes the new Winter (Tue, 06 Nov 2018)
Theresa May would have felt right at home at Twickenham. Even a workable Brexit deal sometimes feels more achievable than locating the solution to rugby union’s unfeasibly tight fixture calendar. For a quarter of a century, if not longer, the sport has been trying to squeeze a globally-accepted quart into a disputed pint pot and … Continue reading Rugby’s Summer becomes the new Winter
>> Read more

The Autumn Window is not entirely open (Tue, 23 Oct 2018)
Rugby’s autumn internationals will be ready to rumble in a couple of weeks. England have a huge game against South Africa at Twickenham, Wales meet Scotland in Cardiff and Ireland face Italy in Chicago. These are big occasions with significant revenues. It is strange, then, that no one in charge of selling tickets, hospitality packages … Continue reading The Autumn Window is not entirely open
>> Read more

Is it so bad if Rugby turns into Football? (Tue, 09 Oct 2018)
The new rugby season is a month old, but this is my first blog of the season, so let’s ride my hobby-horse of how rugby is coming to resemble football. It is because the cry, so often last season, was that rugby was becoming football. Coaches being sacked, the developing transfer market, players talking back … Continue reading Is it so bad if Rugby turns into Football?
>> Read more

Mallinder’s Northampton downfall has parallels with Wenger at Arsenal (Tue, 29 May 2018)
Longevity has come up short. The announcement that Arsène Wenger would leave Arsenal meant this season was the last for the longest-serving club heads in football and rugby’s premierships. Similar to Wenger at Arsenal, Jim Mallinder at Northampton had gone from managing the champions to missing out on a place in the top four for … Continue reading Mallinder’s Northampton downfall has parallels with Wenger at Arsenal
>> Read more

Does Club Rugby need to be Marketed better? (Tue, 01 May 2018)
Is rugby popular, or not very popular at all? The answer is, perhaps weirdly, both. When it comes to international rugby, cup finals, or some annual “special” games, it attracts big numbers. 55,000 fans went to Murrayfield to see Saracens beat Clermont in 2017, 74,000 watched Wales beat Scotland, 82,000 watched England beat Wales and … Continue reading Does Club Rugby need to be Marketed better?
>> Read more

Print Print | Sitemap
© Miles and Miles Publishing

This website was created using 1&1 IONOS MyWebsite.