The Rugby Groud Guide

Stadium & Tickets

 

The Ground       

               

Stadium Name  Stade Yves-Du-Manoir

Stadium Address              12, rue Francois-Faber

                                                92700 Colombes

 

The Stadium       The Stade Olympique Yves-du-Manoir stadium in Colombes,(also known as Stade Olympique de Colombes, or simply Colombes to the locals), is named after French rugby player Yves du Manoir.

It was the main stadium for the 1924"(Chariots of Fire")   summer Olympics, when it had a capacity of 45,000.

Colombes was also the venue for the 1938 World Cup Final between Italy and Hungary, as well as hosting a number of French cup finals and the home games of      the French national football and rugby teams into the 1970's.

It remained the country's largest stadium until the renovated Parc des Princes was opened in 1972. By that         time Colombe's capacity had dropped to under 50,000 for health and safety reasons.

The national rugby union team played its final game at   Colombes in 1972, and the national football team last played there in 1975.

Racing Metro 92 have never left. They originally planned to redevelop Yves-du-Manoir into a 15,000 - seat stadium to be shared with RCP football club, but have since decided to build a completely new stadium, tentatively known as Arena 92 and scheduled for completion in 2015. Situated at La Defense, Paris' high-rise business quarter to the west of the capital, the ultra-modern design features a fully-retractable roof and an all-weather pitch.

 

Getting There    A free RATP shuttle bus connects the station RER A NANTERRE-Prefecture and Yves-du-Manoir stadium Stop. Gare de Colombes, from Gare St. Lazare is a 10-minute walk from the stadium.

Or take Metro Line 13 to Asnieres-Gennevilliers/Courtilles and then take bus 126,235 or 304

 Capacity              14,000

Ticketing:Racing Rugby Shop @

                121 Boulevard Saint Germain, Paris 6th

                Mon - Sat 10am - 7.30pm

               

                Racing Rugby Shop @

                42 Avenue de Wagram,Paris 8th

                Mon - Sat 10am - 7.30pm

               

 

 

Updated October 2015

 

Copyright Miles & Miles Publishing 2015

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