The Rugby Groud Guide

Stadium/Tickets

Introduction:

The  black-and-white adorned players at Newcastle United's St James' Park might be the more famous team in the Toon, but it’s not all football in the North-East.

There is a thriving rugby union culture and the Falcons have a huge catchment area to draw from-from Northumberland in the east to Cumbria in the west and right up to the Scottish borders.

A big problem is however attracting fans to Kingston Park. The ground is normally less than half-full, even in the Premiership.

 

Stadium Name: Kingston Park

Stadium Address:

Brunton Road

Kenton Bank Foot

Kingston Park

Newcastle Upon Tyne

Tyne & Wear, NE13 8AF

 

Ground Information:

It was only in 1990 when the Falcons-under the name Newcastle Gosforth- moved into their current home, Kingston Park. Since the professional era   Kingston Park has undergone a number of facelifts, firstly with the installation of a   temporary stand on the western side of the ground, and most recently the construction of three completely new permanent stands. These are the main West Stand, the popular covered   terracing of the John Smiths Stand, and the uncovered terracing of the North Stand.

East Stand: The East Stand houses the club’s offices and changing rooms, as well as the Hiding Place Sports and Lounge Bar, which is open to the public   every day of the week. The East Stand was the only stand present when Kingston Park   was originally converted into a rugby stadium by Newcastle Gosforth, and the ticket office and club shop can also be found there.

John Smith's Stand: The sheltered   terracing of the John Smith's Stand at the south end of the ground. has already carved out somewhat of a vocal reputation   for itself, with the noise generated there being heard right across the pitch. The South Stand bar is also a lively post and pre-match venue for both home and away fans.

 

West Stand: The all-seater West Stand is home to the club's corporate clients and Premier Club members. The press box and stadium control rooms are both   housed in the stand, which has three levels of bars and function rooms. The Concourse Bar on the ground floor runs the length of the field.

North Stand: The uncovered terracing of   the North Stand provides the most easily accessible area of the ground for many fans. Plans are in place to add a roof to the stand as well as more facilities.

 

The pitch at Kingston Park recently went under renovation, replacing the former grass surface with a 3G Synthetic pitch.

In June 2015 the Falcons bought Kingston Park back from Northumbria University

 

 

Ticket Office:

 0871 226 6060

Online at www.newcastle-falcons.co.uk

The Box Office is situated in the East Stand

Ticket Prices: 2016/17

http://www.newcastlefalcons.co.uk/Pages/Tickets/pricing

 

Disabled Facilities

There a small number of disabled parking spaces at the ground-contact the ticket office for availability

 

 

 

 

Last Updated July 2016

 

 

Copyright Miles & Miles Publishing 2016

 

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