The Rugby Groud Guide

Stadium and Tickets

The Stadium (s)

 

Toulouse play their home games at the Stade Ernest-Wallon , which was built in the 1980’s. The capacity is 19,000.The stadium is located north-west of Toulouse city centre.

 However, for big games, such as Championship play-offs, or Heineken Cup games, the fixture may be moved to Stade de Toulouse ( known simply as Le Stade, or Le Stadium), which has double the capacity at 38,000.Le Stadium opened as a bull-ring in 1949, but soon became the home of Toulouse F.C., as it remains today.  The first rugby international was France v Czechoslovakia in 1956. Le Stadium was renovated in time for FIFA World Cup in 1998, and used for four matches in the 2007 Rugby World Cup.

 

Stadium Name  Stade Ernest-Walton

Stadium Address              114, Rue des Troenes BP 42354

                31022 Toulouse Minimes Cedex 2

                France

               

Telephone          (33) 5 34 42 24 22

Fax         (33) 5 34 42 24 23

               

Capacity               18,754

               

               

Tickets  It is easy to buy tickets on the day of the match at Stade Ernst Wallon, as there are three ticket offices at the stadium

 One is in between the East and South Stands, and there is another one is outside the South Stand. The main ticket   office is outside the West Stand.

The cheapest seats are at either end for about £6., while the  most expensive, at around £26, are on the East and West sides, within both 22 metre lines.

 

It is also possible to buy tickets in the centre of town. The Virgin shop, on Rue d'Alsace opposite the tourist office and Capitole Metro station, sell them on the ground floor, while it is also possible to get tickets from Fnac near Place Wilson and Jean-Jaures Metro station or www.fnac.com

Tickets can also be bought at Leclerc supermarkets in the area.  There is one at Toulouse-Blagnac airport.

 Carrefour supermarkets also sell tickets.

Another option is to try www.ticketnet.fr.

               

The South Stand is for home supporters and it is here where the most passionate Toulouse fans and the raucous band are housed. The main chant of the Toulouse faithful is   "Toulousain allez, allez, allez" to the Beatles classic "We all live in a Yellow Submarine"

Although the majority of away fans sit in the East Stand it is not a problem for away fans to sit in home sections.

Disabled Facilities: The majority of disabled access is in the West Stand.

There is some access in the East Stand.

               

Eating and Drinking         Stade Toulousain Brasserie (33) 5 3442 2420 , is a brasserie at the ground, which serves excellent sit-down meals.

There are also several bars dotted around the ground, the biggest of which is underneath the South Stand. There is usually only one food stall outside the ground that sells Toulouse sausages in baguettes for £2, fries £1.50 and  canned beer and drinks.

For a night game, kebab, sausage and drinks stalls abound. If you want to get a drink during half-time avoid the South Stand bar where major queues develop.

You stand a better chance of getting served at the East Stand bar

               

Bars Nearby       De Danu Irish Bar

                9 Rue du Pont Guilhemery

               

                Bodega Bodega

                1 Rue Gabriel-Peri

               

                Le Pere Louis

                45 Rue des Tourners

               

                Le Rembrandt

                Rue Baour-Lormian

               

               

Fixtures 2015/16               www.stadetoulousain.fr

               

               

Club Shop            The merchandise shop is just within the gates on the left of the main entrance behind the West Stand.

There is also a merchandise shop in the centre of town that is far bigger than the one at the stadium. It is located between     the Rue de Remusat and the Rue d'Alsace-Lorraine.

               

     

             

               

            

   Stade Municipal

               

                For big games, such as Championship play-offs, or Heineken Cup games the fixture may be moved to Stade Municipal (Known as Le Stade, or Le Stadium,or Stade de Toulouse)

                The Stade Municipal was originally opened in 1949 as amulti-sport venue. The stadium is a classical shape, with two side stands ( the Honneur Nord and Sud) and two curved stands behind the goals. The view from most areas is excellent-the curves behind the goal are not as pronounced as traditional athletic-type stadiums and so you are not far away from the action. In sunnier months the setting sun can cause an issue for those in the East Stand.

How to get there:

The stadium is located to the south of the city centre, on an island in the middle of the Garonne River. It is easily walk able on a nice day, especially if you have been enjoying  a long lunch around Pont Neuf or Rue du Metz.

However, if you want to come by public transport then use either Metro Line A  to Arenes or Line B to St Michel-Marcel. Both stations are within a 5-minute walk to the stadium.

 Allow around 30 minutes to reach the stadium from Matabiaustation. Buses 1 , 12 , 34 and 52 also drop you off close to the stadium from the city centre.

 

 

 

Updated October 2015

 

 

 

Copyright Miles & Miles Publishing 2015

Does Test Rugby need stricter rules? (Tue, 14 Nov 2017)
Evidently Rhys Webb wants to have his Welsh cake and eat it. The Ospreys and Lions scrum-half signed for Toulon earlier this month, days before the Welsh Rugby Union announced a change to its policy governing players outside the country, entrapping the 28-year old. The new rules outline that players moving to England or France … Continue reading Does Test Rugby need stricter rules?
>> Read more

Could ending promotion solve rugby’s problems? (Tue, 17 Oct 2017)
  We could be witnessing the start of a perfect storm for English rugby:  too many clubs losing too much money, ever-increasing demands on players to the extent that strike action has been mentioned, and PRL’s latest whizz, the controversial suggestion that the domestic season should run from September through to the end of June. … Continue reading Could ending promotion solve rugby’s problems?
>> Read more

Rugby union is moving towards Football – it’s very sad…No it’s not,It’s reality (Wed, 06 Sep 2017)
On the weekend when the Aviva Premiership season kicked off there was this headline in The Telegraph: “We’re moving towards football, slowly but surely – it’s very sad” While the article started off by congratulating the sport on the increased number of spectators it was attracting, it’s increased television audiences, how sponsors were falling over … Continue reading Rugby union is moving towards Football – it’s very sad…No it’s not,It’s reality
>> Read more

Rugby needs to learn the right lessons from Football (Wed, 17 May 2017)
Colin Boag is a regular columnist in The Rugby Paper, and I usually find him worth reading. However, he is one of those rugby writers who like to blame all rugby’s ills on football. He was at it again in a recent column. He was writing about players’ attempts to get others booked, and predictably … Continue reading Rugby needs to learn the right lessons from Football
>> Read more

Premiership Rugby ambition must be challenged by RFU. (Mon, 08 May 2017)
The Champions Cup final this weekend will lack a team from the Pro 12 for the fifth consecutive season following the Munster and Leinster semi-final defeats. The tournament has become an Anglo-French production, although in those five years only four clubs have made it to the final: Toulon, Saracens, Clermont Auvergne and, last year, Racing … Continue reading Premiership Rugby ambition must be challenged by RFU.
>> Read more

Print Print | Sitemap
© Miles and Miles Publishing

This website was created using 1&1 MyWebsite.